Articles Posted in Custody

child support lawyerIf a couple has children, the Florida courts will ensure that their financial needs are met to the best of the parents’ abilities. Child support pays for things like food, health care, and shelter. You might be wondering about how child support is determined in Florida. This article provides a brief overview of what to expect. If you are looking for an experienced child support attorney in Jacksonville, call Parker & DuFresne today to set up a free consultation.

An Overview of Child Support in Florida

Raising children is expensive. When funds are coming from just one parent, the financial burden can be unbearable at times. Fortunately, in Florida, both parents are obligated to support their child financially. The “Income Shares Model” is used when calculating how much each parent pays in child support. This model is based on how the finances work in an intact household, where the parents money is pooled. The court uses a set of guidelines to determine how much of that money would be spent on supporting the child.

Custody AgreementSplitting up can incite a lot of emotions for all parties involved. When disputes arise an individual may unintentionally break their custody agreement. However, how does one know if they are violating a custody order? A Jacksonville child custody attorney can tell you whether or not you would be violating an agreement.

Frequent Custody Agreement Violations

Here are some common custody agreement violations:

An adult holding their child's handThere are several ways that child custody can be arranged in a divorce. When both parents want to be actively involved in the child’s life, shared custody and joint custody will be considered. They may sound like the same thing, but there are some important differences to be aware of. Be sure to work with an experienced divorce lawyer in Jacksonville to help you determine the best arrangement for you and your child.

What is Shared Custody?

In shared custody, both parents have shared legal physical rights to their child. Both parents receive approximately the same amount of time caring for the child in their separate homes. Generally, this works out best when both parents agree to a set schedule. If that’s not attainable, the judge will determine which parent has primary custody. He may also arrange a set visitation schedule.